Monday, January 2, 2006

This blog unviewable in China

Coming Anarchy reports that blogspot.com (among a number of other services) is not viewable in China.

Is this my fault? Did I piss them off with
this, this, this, this, or even this?

Or was it free speech in general that got them nervous?

Or maybe it was
this:


[I would amend this map to include at least a strip along North Korea as Occupied Korea , and maybe next to that Occupied Manchuria, but I'm not married to the idea.] Sphere: Related Content

23 comments:

  1. Definitely need to include occupied Manchuria. What has been done to their culture and their language is sickening. Going further, large parts of the south are definitely not Han either....

    ReplyDelete
  2. Sonagi, I was referring to Occupied Koguryŏ [since this is a Korean Studies-related issue, I am loath to spell it Goguryeo, which I've heard people pronounce as 꼬구리오 or 꼬굴예오] when I wrote "Occupied Korea."

    San Nakji, I am also loath to include too many things in the "occupied" territories. Stuff from the last 150 years are enough, methinks. Sure, there are other areas taken from other peoples, but that's why those areas are labeled "the Han Tyrrany."

    ReplyDelete
  3. With all these little stamp like things people have on their blog advertising stats tracking or political movements and things like that, there has got to be a "this blog banned in china seal of approval" or something like that which lets you know if it's a good blog or a stupid one. You need to get the seal, as you've already been approved :) hehe.

    ReplyDelete
  4. With all the negativity and
    thrashing that are gong on against Korea on the internet blogs/boards,
    I wonder whether there is any site
    inaccessible to korean netizens..

    ReplyDelete
  5. Harry,
    Since Korea is a democracy where free speech supposedly reigns, there shouldn't be any blogs inaccessible to South Koreans, with the exception of those that violate the National Security Law in relation to North Korea.

    However, the ROK government under President Roh Moohyun did ask major ISPs to block allegedly "pro-Japanese" sites at the height of the Tokto/Takeshima controversy last year, when he declared "diplomatic war" on Koizumi.

    From now on, when I bring that up, I will add that Roh's policies toward Tokyo are a direct contradiction to the forward-thinking, future-oriented policies of President Kim Daejung and Japanese PM Obuchi.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Let's also remember that the terminology Han is used in quite liberal fashion... there is more of variaty even within `Han' ethnic group. I belive that `Han'
    ethnic group as well as the concept of current day `China' are political constructs coined to keep everything glued together.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Everyone knows Roh is not material for president. His policy reeks of inconsistency, lacking of vision
    and ad hoc amateurism. Blocking of NK sensitive sites(for fear of offending KJI) is
    not necessary nor is that of pro-japanese sites..

    ReplyDelete
  8. I agree with you for the most part, but I have to point out that blocking North Korea-supporting websites is probably out of Roh's hands. It's the National Security Law that is responsible for that.

    Blocking "pro-Japanese" sites (and I put that in quotations because what is "pro-Japanese" is definitely a judgement call) was his own call and it was a political move designed to shore up his plummeting approval ratings. It didn't really work, though.

    I hope a conservative or a pragmatic moderate gets elected in 2007.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I didn't notice your occupied Korea until after I posted. Ask an English speaker unfamiliar with the Korean language to pronounce "Koguryo," and they will use an aspirated /k/. I do prefer the diacritic marks to dipthongs like /eo/.

    In the past, the Korean government has also blocked Dave's ESL Cafe and websites with footage of the beheading of the Korean man in Iraq.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I thought that some of the anti-NK sites were also banned in order to avoid offending KJI, I don't know whether that is true or not. But given the hush-hush mood prevalent in S.K. I think that it is very likely.
    I remeber 2002... World cup craze and then on Roh gets elected by the fervent support of 20 somethings... Soccer $ populism
    = latin american banana republic.

    ReplyDelete
  11. thought that some of the anti-NK sites were also banned in order to avoid offending KJI, I don't know whether that is true or not.

    I have heard that, too, but I can't recall if it's true or not and it's too late at night for me to look it up.

    But given the hush-hush mood prevalent in S.K. I think that it is very likely.

    Fortunately the other side is speaking out a lot more than before.

    I remeber 2002... World cup craze and then on Roh gets elected by the fervent support of 20 somethings...

    I know that there are hundreds of bloggers who would disagree with me, but my contention is that it was not anti-American sentiment or Korean nationalism that won Roh that election. It was pandering to the residents of Chungchong, plain and simple. Roh won by a couple percentage points, which he got from his promise to the residents of Chungchong to move the capital there.

    Soccer $ populism
    = latin american banana republic.


    Hadn't thought of it that way, but maybe.

    I guess in the U.S., religious fervor guiding politics = talibanism?

    Oh, I'm just kidding.

    ReplyDelete
  12. By the way, what is your take on Gando issue... Is there any legal
    gound for it? and is it a factor
    for China in shaping the policies regarding Korea(s) and the future unified Korea?

    ReplyDelete
  13. "Inconsistency" is what best describes President Rho himself and his policies. But horrible it is to see that turns out to tell about his insecurity as head of state...Hope it will never happen until the end of his terms.

    ReplyDelete
  14. It's weird, but thanks to this post, my blog got more comments yesterday than Marmot's did.

    That's definitely a first.

    ReplyDelete
  15. What is the Gando issue?

    I hope your blog doesn't get too popular, Kushibo. Your cybercrib and Oranckay's blog are a peaceful respite from the clatter over at the Marmot's.

    ReplyDelete
  16. As I said at Coming Anarchy, that blogspot was blocked has nothing to do with the content of English language political blogs and everything to do with Chinese language political blogs. It might be self-aggrandizing to think that you've come under the scrutiny of the evil chicom censors but the fact of the matter is, you are the victim of a blanket domain ban as was TDAXP

    ReplyDelete
  17. What is the Gando issue?

    It's a territorial land grab that China was able to pull off with Japan's help about a hundred years ago.

    I hope your blog doesn't get too popular, Kushibo. Your cybercrib and Oranckay's blog are a peaceful respite from the clatter over at the Marmot's.

    Well thanks a lot, Sonagi. I guess my raison d'être is just to be your blog-toy.

    Don't worry. I will do my moderating best to make sure things don't get too out of hand.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Jing wrote:
    As I said at Coming Anarchy, that blogspot was blocked has nothing to do with the content of English language political blogs and everything to do with Chinese language political blogs.

    Oh, I know. I was just having fun with the whole concept of being part of a system that is being censored out in its entirety.

    It might be self-aggrandizing to think that you've come under the scrutiny of the evil chicom censors but the fact of the matter is, you are the victim of a blanket domain ban as was TDAXP

    Don't worry, Jing. I have no illusions of blogging grandeur. I know there's no one sitting in China going, "Ooh, that pesky Kushibo really gets under my craw." Thailand or Australia, maybe, but not Beijing.

    Yes, I know it's not Kushibo that is responsible for this, but a bunch of smaller (mostly Chinese-language blogging) kushibos that are being blocked.

    But the point still stands: this blog is supposed to be unviewable in China. And this is important because people (Koreans, North Americans, Europeans, and also Japanese) need to be aware that China is NOT just another socio-political equivalent of Korea, Japan, Taiwan, New Zealand, Canada, Belgiu, or even Hong Kong.

    They are an oppressive state that suppresses dissent in a way quite different from how Taiwan or South Korea did during the years before their complete democratization.

    I think China is a fascinating country and my experience with Mainland Chinese individuals have been overwhelmingly positive, but as South Koreans take stock of their relationships, or as Americans look to their economic opportunities, for example, they need to realize that, AS THIS BLOGSPOT BAN EXEMPLIFIES, China is not a country that shares their values.

    Not by a long shot.

    I would like to see China change. I am hopeful that it will. Unlike people like Baduk, I don't see conflict between China and Japan or China and the US as an inevitability. China can be eased into the league of mostly democratic nations where the people's voice is seen as a guide to where the country should go, not something that is potentially subversive.

    And so things like this need to be brought up as a reminder.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Hey Blogtoy, here is Gando? I've never heard of it.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Have you checked out the story about MSN dropping a Chinese blogger on Rebecca MacKinnon's blog?

    http://rconversation.blogs.com/rconversation/2006/01/microsoft_takes.html

    ReplyDelete
  21. san nakji, I would say that occupied Manchuria is really a total non issue- Manchuria doesn't exist anymore. And you can't really blame the Chinese for that, their language and culture was already on total life support by the end of the Qing dynasty, and when the Manchu imperial family stopped supporting the little bit that was left, the remaining few Manchurians became totally Sinicised.

    This is just part of the general creep effect of Han civilization. Genetic studies have showed that North Chinese are closer to Mongols/Koreans/Japanese and South Chinese are closer to SE Asians, but they all call themselves Han Chinese because they've joined the Han hegemonic cultural sphere.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Kushibo, I usually agree with your views on China, but I think you are being a little too dramatic with your map of "Occupied East Turkestan", "The Han Tyranny", etc.

    I agree that the Chinese government brutally suppresses all opposition, and has waged a vicious campaign of cultural and demographic assimilation against Tibetans, Mongolians, Turkestanis and other minorities. However, there is no point in wallowing in dramatic talk. After all, the Chinese are not anywhere near as brutal as the Russians in Chechnya, or the Americans in Iraq. Why pick on China?

    Moreover, China is at a kind of crossroads. The government has reformed the economy totally. There are a huge number of lawyers, teachers, activists and even Communists, who are pressing for political reform. The West, especially US corporations, have been happy to aid China with technology to censor websites, text messages and emails. This should stop, but the answer is not to demonize or antagonize China. This plays into the hands of the rabid anti-China crowd, especially the extreme-right in the US. This group wants to see a weak China that is subservient to American interests. Being openly hostile to China helps the extremists on both sides, much as extremists in the middle east rely on extremists in the US to justify their brutality. You must give room for patriotic Chinese to accept your arguments & criticism of the Communists without insulting their nation. Don't forget that the Nationalists in Taiwan claimed "outer" Mongolia in addition to "inner" Mongolia. My point is that no Chinese will support dismemberment of China, because this reminds them of the nightmare of Chinese weakness after the Opium Wars. Authentic self-rule is the reasonable goal for minorities in China, along the lines of India.

    As for comparisons between Communist China and the Nationalists in Taiwan, you are making a huge error. The Nationalists perpetrated atrocities and slaughter on a very similar scale when they ruled China. They had learned their lesson by the time they fled to Taiwan, which explains their relatively benign dictatorship. I agree, however, that the Communists are not simple dictators or fascists, for they have uprooted Chinese culture on a scale that was unimaginable to the Nationalists. Thuggish dictators like Park Chung-hee and Chiang Kai-shek were brutal, but they did not annihilate thousands of years of culture and tradition, as the Communists did in China and North Korea.

    ReplyDelete

Share your thoughts, but please be kind and respectful. My mom reads this blog.